what is active causative verb
English Grammars

Active causative verb | causative active and passive

ACTIVE CAUSATIVE VERBS

Active Causative verbs are utilized to cause someone else to do something.  Causative is taken from the word cause. So when we cause someone else to do something for us. We ourselves do not do it. It means I do not actually do anything, but ask someone else to do it for me. Active causative verbs are explained below.

Example:            

  • She washed his dishes.                 (Here, she washed the dishes himself.)
  • John had Kamran wash his clothes.          (Here, John hired Kamran to wash his clothes.)

The followings are causative verbs.

  • Have/Has           
  • Get       
  • Let         
  • Make   
  • Usages
  • Have/Has            (Hire someone) we use has/have to hire someone else to do something for us

    He has Ahmad do his work.         (Bare infinitive is used after the agent when the causative verb is HAVE/HAS.)

2. Get: (Persuade) we use “get” to persuade someone to do our work. Persuade means to convince.

  • He gets Ollie to do his homework.            (Full-infinitive is used after getting.)

3. Let (Allowance) when we give permission to someone to do our work.

  • He let me get in.             (Bare infinitive is used with Let.)

4. Make: (Persuade) when convincing someone to do the work.

  • She makes him clean his room.  (Bare infinitive is used with make.)

The Causative verbs letmake, and have,  are followed by a bare infinitive.  

HOW TO USE CAUSATIVE VERBS IN ENGLISH Grammatical structure.

Let + person/thing+1st of the verb

LET   Means   PERMIT

Examples:

  •  I let him play football.
  • The teacher let the students write down the notes.
  • She let the farmer cut the grass.
  • We let them go.
  • He let me turn on the fan.

Remember: The past tense of let is also let; there is no change!

MAKE = It means Force, someone, to do something.

Grammatical structure:
MAKE + PERSON + 1st form of the verb.
Examples:

  • We made them compile the story.
  • His father made him tune on the fan.
  • The teacher made all the students rewrite their papers

HAVE = Give Responsibility to Do Something

Grammatical structure:
 HAVE + PERSON + VERB (base form)

Example:

  • I have him wash the car.
  • She has john rub the book.

HAVE + THING + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB

  • I’m going to have my hair cut tomorrow.
  • We’re having our house painted.
  • Tom had his nail cut.

The Causative verbs get and force are followed by a full infinitive.  

GET = CONVINCE/ENCOURAGE SOMEONE TO DO SOMETHING

Grammatical structure:

GET + PERSON + TO + VERB
Examples:

  • We get them to complete the work.
  • I got him to rub the whiteboard.
  • I can never get him to wash the dishes.

The Causative verbs Help is followed by both full infinitive and bare infinitive.  In general, the form without “to” is more common:

Force + compel someone to do something.

force + PERSON + TO + VERB

  • The thief forced him to give everything.
  • The teacher should force the students to study.

 HELP = Assist Someone in Doing Something

Grammatical structure:
HELP + PERSON + VERB (base form)

  • He helped me carry the boxes.
  • Reading before bed helps me relax.

HELP + PERSON + TO + VERB

  • He helped her to carry the boxes.
  • He helped me to carry the boxes.
  • Reading before bed helps me to relax.